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Physics Colloquium, Nicolas Biais, "Superheroes of the human microbiota: Introduction to Mechano-Micro-Biology"

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Physics Colloquium, Nicolas Biais, "Superheroes of the human microbiota: Introduction to Mechano-Micro-Biology"
When May 16, 2018
from 04:00 PM to 05:00 PM
Where MR418N
Contact Name
Contact Phone 212-650-7443
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Physics Colloquium

"Superheroes of the human microbiota: Introduction to Mechano-Micro-Biology"

 

Nicolas Biais, Assistant Professor
Biology, Brooklyn College, CUNY

Abstract:
We all have more bacterial cells in us and on us than our own cells. Many bacteria bear appendages called Type IV pili.

These long retractable polymers enable bacteria to exert forces on their surroundings and between each other. We will show characterization

of the physical forces involved and how they can shape the interaction between bacterial cells and between bacterial cells and substrates whether abiotic or human cells.

Nicolas Biais received a Ph.D. at the interface between physics and biology from University Paris 7 in France (a.k.a. Université Paris Diderot) studying the role of physical forces in the organization and motility of different eukaryotic systems. He switched gears to look at smaller entities when he joined Michael Sheetz's lab at Columbia University in 2004 and started studying the role of physical forces in the microbial world. Under the mentorship of Magdalene So first at OHSU, Portland, then at University of Arizona, Tucson, he was introduced to the intricacies of microbiology and decided that he found his scientific home. Joining Brooklyn College in 2013, Biais started a lab dedicated to the study of the role of physical forces in microbiology, the Mechano-Micro Biology Lab, where he is happily merging biochemistry, genetics and molecular biology with the development of new force measurement devices.