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Physics Colloquium: Edwin Barnes, Toward the next quantum revolution: controlling physical systems and taming decoherence

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Physics Colloquium: Edwin Barnes, Toward the next quantum revolution: controlling physical systems and taming decoherence
When Apr 10, 2019
from 04:00 PM to 05:00 PM
Where MR418N
Contact Name
Contact Phone 212-650-7443
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Toward the next quantum revolution: controlling physical systems and taming decoherence

Edwin Barnes
Assistant Professor
Department of Physics
Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA



Abstract:

Recent years have witnessed enormous progress toward harnessing the power of quantum mechanics and integrating it into novel technologies capable of performing tasks far beyond present-day capabilities. Future technologies such as quantum computing, sensing and communication demand the ability to control microscopic quantum systems with unprecedented accuracy. This task is particularly daunting due to unwanted and unavoidable interactions with noisy environments that destroy quantum information in a process known as decoherence. I will present recent progress in understanding and modeling the effects of noise on the dynamics of a quantum bit and show how this can be used to develop new ways to slow down decoherence. I will then describe a new general theory for dynamically combating decoherence by driving quantum bits in such a way that noise effects destructively interfere and cancel out, enabling the high level of control needed to realize quantum information technologies.

Research Interest:

Condensed Matter Theory and Quantum Information Science
Our research spans a number of topics in quantum theory, including spin- and superconducting circuit-based quantum computation, dynamical error suppression in quantum systems, quantum communication, many-body localization, time crystals and driven non-equilibrium spin dynamics, non-equilibrium physics in 2D materials, many-body interactions in graphene, and novel topological materials such as topological insulators and Weyl semimetals. There is a particular emphasis on bridging formal, mathematical constructs with research closely connected to experiment.